Energy in Motion.

Energy in Motion.

In the span of a single second, our lives can change, as energy moves at a pace more rapid than anything we can fathom.
By Madisyn Taylor
Since our lives are constantly in motion energetically, change is a constant element of our existence.
As dynamic as that energy is, it is not random or haphazard in nature — the shifts in energy that are constantly taking place are the result of our choices. The formulation of intention, a change in perspective, or the creation of a goal can transform our lives in blink of an eye.

We think positive thoughts and the world becomes a brighter place. Or we decide who we want to be and become that person. With each passing moment, we are given innumerable opportunities to create change using nothing more than our awareness. 

In the span of a single second, our lives can change immeasurably because energy moves at a pace more rapid than anything we can consciously fathom. Though we may not at first be sensitive to the vibrational shifts taking place, our choices are ultimately at the heart of these transformations.

We can typically recognize the consequences of key decisions because we anticipated the resultant energetic shifts. But many, if not most, of the choices we make each day are a product of instantaneous reactions, and these still have a significant impact on the energy of our existence. It is for this reason that we should learn to wield what control we can over these shifts. If we bear in mind that all we think and all we do will shape the existence we know, we can deliberately direct the energetic motion of our lives.

Each day, you make an infinite array of decisions that cause energy shifts in the world around you. In many cases, these transitions are almost imperceptible, while in others the change that takes place is palpable not only to you but also to those in your sphere of influence.

Your awareness of the immediate energetic consequences of your thoughts and actions can guide you as you endeavor to make the most of the autonomy that defines you as an individual.

The myriad choices you make from moment to moment, however inconsequential they may seem, represent your personal power, which sanctions you to transform the energetic tide of your existence with nothing more than your will.
Stepping into Possibility.

Stepping into Possibility.

Text from Meg Kelley

I sat at the edge of the dock and watched the lake’s waves gently crest and fall, undulating in sun-tinted hills and valleys that stretched as far as my eyes could see. The flow seemed in unison, geese flocking all in the same direction as the tide came in, storm clouds in the far distance drawing near.

As my legs dangled there, warmed by the still-present sun, clouds beginning to cover the sky in a cotton blanket, my toes just grazed the surface. I witnessed the reverberations of this tiny action, small ripples in all directions of where skin met water and water met skin. A smile crawls across my face.

I considered all the times that I focused on the splash. When faced with an approaching deadline or a problem to solve, I’d throw myself into one well-thought-out, perfected direction to make the thing I wanted most happen. Sometimes it worked, sometimes it didn’t, but every time I could guarantee I’d be exhausted.

When faced with a decision to try something new or let go of something old, I never bothered to witness what would happen if I just inched a toe in, allowing a tiny action to take it’s course over and over again. Dipping just a toe in could change everything. I might not be able to swim across the lake in one day. But the physics, the butterfly-effect mechanics of it move forward from just my willingness to show up, be present, and step in.

Being the type-A planner and over-thinker that I am, trying to start something without having fully charted a course usually stops me in my tracks. Shouldn’t I have this totally mapped out? Aren’t I just inviting a ton of mistakes and last-minute choices? Don’t I first need to research everything everyone else has done in a similar situation?

While some choices do require a lot of planning, maybe it doesn’t always have to be that complicated. Maybe the way to do a lot of things is that simple: You start trying to do the thing. You see what happens. Instead of using check-the-box, step-by-step processes, you focus on how you feel. You turn back when it no longer feels like you. You accept that perhaps there isn’t an end. It’s just a continual process of showing up more fully and finding the baseline joy in being yourself, even when it doesn’t feel easy.

It’s one thing to say, “Go on ahead, step your toe in,” but it’s another thing to actually get started in the face of second-guessing and resistance. How do you begin making even the tiniest of progress forward? What if you don’t even know what forward looks like? I don’t have the answers to any of this. But for me, it never hurts to get quiet and ask more questions.

Often, I reflect on these in my journal. Here are a few of my favorites:

1. What am I awake to now that I wasn’t before?

If I listen closely, there are voices I have failed to listen to, there are angles and curves and depths to this water where I can learn more, and places where my heart can break open wider to not just set my own self, but others around me free. I try to think about the one, tiny action-oriented thing I can do to acknowledge and uplift those voices and places. That’s forward motion.

2. How am I holding on too tightly?

Lately, I feel like I am just hanging on to my well-being by the tips of my fingers. But every few days, I hit on that joyous, spacious, floating feeling and wonder how that happens. Mostly, it only happens when I am okay with things not going how I want them to go. Even if I feel like things are out of control, I find comfort in knowing I can paddle my own boat, right here, in this body I have right now, no matter how many waves are crashing into me.

3. How am I focusing on the barriers?

If I pay attention, I can see that I’m actually not an incredibly unlucky person who has bad things happen to her, but a person who focuses on only the supposedly bad things that happen to her. This isn’t about self-blame, but rather, reframing the regret of past events or the anxiety about the future as the blocks I’ve created in my flow. These are barriers in the water that I am choosing to narrowly focus on, instead of noticing that water moves around and through things every day. I may wobble, shift, and change, but as I slowly come out from the other side, I’ll be more resilient, centered, and transformed.

Overall, these questions help me explore the fear of stepping into the unknown, and instead of looking solely at the risks of what could go wrong, to focus also on the opportunities that the unknown presents. Keep in mind: You can always pivot, turn back, or flat out quit. You aren’t trying to end up somewhere exactly, you’re taking one step into the water of possibility, with your curiosity as your compass.

If asking these questions makes this notion sound simple, perfect, or complete, as if it will feel effortless—it won’t. It is akin to a tidal force—we have to continually sink back into our own knowledge in order to reach forward. There’s no shortcut here around yourself, which is perhaps the most difficult challenge to confront of all.

But I know this: If you never step into the water, you’ll never know where the ripples take you. Maybe, even if darkness approaches, I can dip my toe into this water, and maybe, the effect of my ripples are somewhere out there, as you read this, navigating to you. It seems like a good possibility, and one worth smiling about.

. . .

Purpose for the New Year.

Purpose for the New Year.

Most people assume that a purpose is the same as a goal. They work towards it as though it’s a specific destination to arrive at.

I now understand this is the wrong way to find your life purpose.

Instead, your life purpose comes from your values. It is something that has always existed inside you and just needs to be discovered.

When you think of life purpose in this way, it’s easier to define.

To help you define yours, Justin Brown put together 8 thought-provoking (yet a little weird) questions that will help you to discover your own life purpose. I encourage you to jot down your answers to each question in notes as you move through them.

8. What were you passionate about as a child?

The  games we played as children are often a gateway to our potential to excel at something when we grow up.

Think about your Barbie dolls. Did you dress them, or did you make clothes for them?

Think about your trucks and cars. Did you race around with them, or did you construct a town, complete with streets, houses, trees, shops, and garages?

What did you play for hours? Can you still relate to that? If you can, how can you incorporate that into your adult life now?

Were you advised that you should forget your childhood dreams, and do something practical with your life instead? Did you go on to study something other than what you really wanted to in university?

Do you wish that you went a different route instead?

Hidden in our childhood passions, are our gifts, the things we are naturally good at. Think back and see what treasure you can find there, which can hold the key to your life purpose.

PRO TIP: While thinking about what you were passionate about as a child, try and jot down some of your favorite memories. Write down what happened, and also importantly how you were feeling in these moments. This will help you connect with your “inner child”. Over time, your inner child will start to communicate with you about your overriding purpose in life.

7. If you didn’t have a job, how would you choose to fill your hours?

Here is something to ponder. If you didn’t have to work and you weren’t allowed to stay at home and do nothing, how would you choose to fill your time? Where would you go and what would you do?

Let’s say you use some of the time to relax and unwind and some to exercise, what would you do with the rest of your time? Would you spend the day doing something active like exploring the town, would you go to a museum or visit art galleries? Would you read, volunteer somewhere, take a class? Where would you volunteer? Which class would you take?

When money isn’t an issue, and you can devote yourself solely to your passion, what would this passion be?

REAL LIFE EXAMPLE: I did this exercise a few weeks ago, and realized I wanted to read more educational books. The kinds of books that help me learn more about myself and the world around me. It helped me to see that one of my values is learning. I love nothing more than experiencing an “aha moment”, a surge of inspiration when I connect the dots. My purpose is to help others experience this.

6. What makes you forget about the world around you?

Is there something that you really, really love to do? Something that makes you lose track of time?

If you have ever been completely absorbed in an activity you will understand the state of “flow” where you lose your sense of time and are completely caught up in what you are doing.

We have all experienced it. For some of us it’s the process of creating something, for others it’s organizing an event, for others, it’s taking care of other people’s needs.

When you’re completely caught up in the “flow”, you forget about time, food and drink or where you are. Being in the flow, you are intensely focused and concentrated, and there is a sense of ecstasy. There is a sense of inner clarity, and you have complete confidence in your skills. All your worries are gone, and you are completely in the present moment. Yet you can lose track of time. This sense of flow is a source of joy and a reward in itself.

When last did you experience this?

GOING DEEPER: The concept of flow is very powerful. When you know what it is, you’ll start to identify areas of your life when you experience it. This will help you uncover your purpose.

5. What issues do you hold close to your heart?

Is there a cause that you feel strongly about? What topics do you like to read about? What topics on the news do you follow, what issues do you keep returning to? What kind of websites attract you? What topics do you discuss with family and friends? Are there any that you get worked up about, that you want to do something about?

When you are passionate about something, then the work you do for this cause will be meaningful and rewarding.

PRO TIP: A useful way to think about this is identifying things that happen in your life that make you want to take a stand. It usually means some kind of boundary has been crossed. Maybe someone is treating a close friend of yours badly. Or perhaps there’s a local political issue making you want to get active. Whatever it is, we set boundaries of what’s acceptable around our values.

4. Who do you spend time with and what do you talk about?

Most of us spend time with people who share our interests and outlook on life. There might be a clue in there for you. Are you spending most of your free time with cycling buddies or just drinking buddies? Do you talk mostly about your shared passion for cycling and improving the sport or do you just chew the breeze with some friends at the local bar?

Do the people you spend your free time with help to give you an indication of your real passion?

What do you talk about? Do you find people ask you for advice? Why would people ask you for advice? Do you have any specialized knowledge? How did you come by that knowledge? Is it something that you feel is what you were meant to do?

The answers to those questions could be very illuminating.

ANOTHER WAY OF THINKING ABOUT IT: Throughout history, humans form into tribes, even in modern-day societies. What is it that connects a tribe? It’s usually a shared focus, purpose or passion. Herein lies a secret to discovering your purpose. Who are the people you’re naturally gravitating to? What are the tribes you want to be a part of? You may start to see the purpose you already have in life.

3. What is on your bucket list?

What do you want to accomplish before you die? This is another exercise that could be very soul searching. Creating a bucket list crystallizes your thinking on what you desire most in life, what you really would not like to miss out on. There is passion there. Why wait?

MY BUCKET LIST: To give you an example that hopefully gets you thinking, I want to learn to fly a plane. I love getting an aerial view of the land around me and feeling in control of my own destiny. This helps me to see that my guiding purpose is to create a system that results in independence for me.

2. If you had a dream, could you make it happen?

Give this serious thought. Even if you have a dream and never attempted it for whatever reason, it’s still a valuable window into what you regard as somehow achievable, otherwise, it would never have entered your mind.

Think of the many people who made seemingly impossible dreams become reality and take heart from that.

Who do you look up to? What is it about them that inspires you?

You can make steps towards following your life purpose right now.

Ask yourself, what is really stopping you?

There’s help everywhere. You don’t have to know everything yourself and you don’t have to do everything yourself. You can get help to make your dream come true.

Think it through. That dream and your life’s purpose is probably one and the same thing.

HERE ARE THREE EXAMPLES: J.K. Rowling was recently divorced, on government aid, and raising a baby on her own when she wrote Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone. She was initially rejected when she first sent out her manuscript to publishers.

Ludwig van Beethoven did not allow his bad hearing and later on, complete deafness, to stop him from composing some of the most beautiful and influential music in the world.

Helen Keller was deaf and blind from the age of 19 months. Yet she was able to be educated and became an author and educator herself.

1. What are the feelings you desire right now?

This is the final and most powerful question that I believe will help you to finally discover your life purpose.

Think of the feelings that you desire right now. Is there anything you’re frustrated by for not feeling?

Exploring your own feelings opens you up to your emotions. Our emotions are often more powerful than our minds and provide us with a lot of guidance about what we really want in life.

Here’s the next step:

Once you figure out the emotions you want to experience, start to identify the areas of your life where you’re helping others to have this experience. You’re probably already doing this in little ways.

What are the feelings you desire right now, and how are they guiding you in your life purpose?

BONUS EXERCISE: I learned about the importance of finding my purpose for life in my emotions from the shaman Rudá Iandé. We were walking together on the streets of São Paulo and I told him I was finding it challenging to discover my purpose. He shared with me the importance of finding your purpose in your emotions. I immediately pulled out my video camera so I could capture it and share it with others because I saw how valuable and counter-intuitive it is. Watch the video below. It will help you discover your purpose.

A New Year, a New Normal, a New Possible, a New You.